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August 31, 2016
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Comics And The Public Arts (Sergio Figueiredo)

This year marks the 170th anniversary of the publication of Rudolphe Töpffer’s Essai de Physiognomonie, a work addressing the theoretical grounding informing the invention of graphic literature and public scholarship that has much in common with contemporary issues surrounding the role of academic discourse in public discourse. While well known…

August 30, 2016
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Academia’s Outer Limits (Michael O’Rourke)

Recently I have spent a great deal of time thinking about the name we might give, however provisionally, to those who work at the furthermost reaches of the academic institution. For a long time I had adopted the term para-academia, and this term continues to do productive and unsettling work…

August 30, 2016
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Anthony Bourdain Meets Mother Theresa – “Voluntourism” Goes Global (Joy Steinberg)

A 2007 Habitat for Humanity trip to Honduras was my first exposure to the third world.  Spending a week in Santa Rosa de Copan and working side by side with future homeowners was truly humbling and eye-opening. Our task for the week was to dig ditches to accommodate the water…

August 30, 2016
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Shopping And The Design Of Mobile Apps As Inwardness (Colbey Reid)

One of the hazards of living in great place when you’re a student is the knowledge that when you’re done with school, you will probably have to leave there to find work. That isn’t a dilemma that plagues all professions, but it is exactly the problem that confronted me after…

August 30, 2016
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Popular Culture, Native Ontology, and the Misuse of Mascots (Kenneth Lokensgard)

The concerns of many Native Americans, regarding their representation in the popular media, have been in the news of late.  Those opposed to the use of Native American-themed sports mascots, images, or team names have highlighted the fact that such representations often perpetuate negative stereotypes and reflect an attitude of…

August 30, 2016
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Understand Shakespeare – Engaging the Critic, the Student and the Community (Joe Aldinger)

The semester of a literary professor often begins in the same way as psychoanalysis—with a bit of resistance. That is especially true if you teach “ancient” texts like Shakespeare, Milton, and Donne.   A colleague of mine recently made this discovery when teaching Margaret Edson’s W;t, a play about a Donne…

August 30, 2016
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Drinkin’ N’ Thinkin’ – Further Reflections (Colbey Reid)

The Fair Game Beverage Company, a small-batch distillery in Pittsboro, NC, has partnered with a Research Triangle professor and Chapel Hill mixologist to revive the ancient tradition of the symposium. The Oxford English Dictionary stylizes these Classical Greek events as “intellectual entertainment.” The distillery uses a folksier parlance. They call…

August 29, 2016
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“Drink ‘n Think” Symposia Revive Ancient Philosophical Tradition (Colbey Reid)

In Culturematic… (2012), the MIT marketer-anthropologist Grant McCracken advises companies to do more than respond to contemporary culture. He urges them to try their hands at making it. They can do so, he explains, using culturematics, or “culture-making machines.” These tools aren’t combinations of silicon and plastic made by some…

August 29, 2016
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Is The Academy A Place for “Idiots”? (George Elerick)

The U.S. economic and social model is associated with substantial levels of social exclusion, including high levels of income inequality, high relative and absolute poverty rates, poor and unequal educational outcomes, poor health outcomes, and high rates of crime and incarceration. At the same time, the available evidence provides little…

August 29, 2016
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Metamodernism – Art After Postmodernism (Sandra Ceas)

Donald Kuspit, postmodern art critic and professor of art history and philosophy, gives a dated and surface view to what is imminently going on in the contemporary world of art in the twenty-first century when he calls it “narcissistic,” “meaningless” and “decadent” in its “metamodern” existence. Two scholars from the…